FAQs

Questions?

Where the heck are you guys?

What about parking?

How may audience members can you seat?

Aren’t you guys really a religious theatre? I mean you work out of a church basement. Some of you attend the church. And what’s the deal with the new play? You got Satan in it. Isn’t that like a character from the Bible?

Are your productions “kid friendly”?

What about food? For god’s sake, what about food?

What about—?

Q: Where the heck are you guys?

A: Good question—but let’s watch the rough language, shall we? We’re located at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Seattle. The street address there is 15 Roy Street. What you need to know is St. Paul’s is a ski-chalet-looking thing across 1st Avenue North from Metropolitan Market, and across Roy Street from Quiznos, and for that matter, right next door to ChopStix. We perform our plays either in the basement of the church (Parish Hall), accessible from the Roy Street side (see posted signs), or in the labyrinth garden at the corner of Roy Street and 1st Avenue. [For directions . . .] [Back to top . . .]

Q: What about parking?

A: What about it?

Q: Do you have any?

A: Nooo, not to speak of, anyway. There are usually a handful of spots remaining in the tiny church lot (after the actors have grabbed the best ones), and street parking is free during the hours of performance. One possible option is parking at the Metropolitan Market, where two hours are free with a purchase. Also, there are bus stops across the street and within two blocks of St. Paul’s.[Back to top . . .]

Q: How may audience members can you seat?

A: In the labyrinth garden, we’ve been getting about 50 people in comfortably. This is in contrast to Parish Hall, where we can usually squeeze in another 20 or so seats, and if we really want to violate fire codes, we can probably shove in more than that and go SRO. [Back to top . . .]

Q: Aren’t you guys really a religious theatre? I mean you work out of a church basement. Some of you attend the church. And what’s the deal with the new play? You got Satan in it. Isn’t that like a character from the Bible?

A: Thank you for asking those questions. We don’t do “religious” plays. Our original plays are sometimes based on stories from the Bible, but religious plays are usually intended to promote the point of view of the given religion, and our stories are much more universal. St. Paul’s Episcopal sees itself as an arts center and welcomes actors, musicians, technicians, and other artists of all faiths or none at all, and no one is given a pitch for the Episcopal faith. Umbrella Theatre specializes in comedies that explore the human condition through the depiction of human foibles, and the upcoming production of “Sam” is no exception. Satan is arguably one of the most interesting characters in all of Western Literature, and Sam, our Satan updated for the 21st century, keeps up that tradition in embodying humankind’s fears and provoking the best in us while unmasking the worst of our behavior. You can well imagine there are lots of opportunities for comedy when including Ms. Satan in the fun. [Back to top . . .]

Q: Are your productions “kid friendly”?

A: Most of them are. You see, Umbrella Theatre Company has discovered a unique, patented process by which our plays reach audiences on two levels: There’s the witty verbal humor, with topical gags and loaded with sexual innuendo; that, of course is for the kids. Then most of our plays are full of sword fights and other stage violence, physical humor, the occasional body functions joke, plus the visual spectacle of costumes and cheap special effects. That’s for the adult audiences, whose senses have been mashed into mush by watching TV reality shows. [Back to top . . .]

Q: What about food? For god’s sake, what about food? Suppose I get hungry? I don’t wanna starve going to one of your plays! I can feel my blood sugar dropping right now—where can I get some food, already? And what about after the play?

A: Don’t worry. Umbrella Theatre is in the heart of Seattle’s Theatre District, and that means we’re within blocks of fine dining for everyone’s budget: Racha Thai, Quizno’s, Cafe Lladro, Peso’s, The Melting Pot, 10 Mercer. Want a quick snack? There’s Metropolitan Market right across the street. After the show, savor the atmosphere and fine dining at T.S. McHugh’s or try one of the fabulous desserts at Cafe Zingaro. [Back to top . . .]

Q: What about–?

A: Hey, what’s with all the damned questions? What are you, my mother?

Q: But, you said–

A: Maybe I oughta just sock you or something! [Back to top . . .]